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Happy Easter

Synopsis: 

A schoolboy tells a story of how a bunch of youngsters robbed a grocery store near the nightclub and after that the nightclub was shut down. (A version of a cult Rostov-on-Don underground nightclub). The other boy with the Quiksilver hat and both ears pierced speculates about the real underground scene and how it differs from “the place where all the scumbags come to” (An intransigent Gabber Hardcore party manager criticizes parties with a wider spectrum of music genres). He ironically distorts the names of current popular Russian hip-hop artists Kizaru and Pharaoh, in so dissing all new school rappers. Young people exchange phrases, half of which consist of curse words, carry desktop computers along with midi controllers to a taxi (a popular DJ who runs school parties that carries his equipment to play at each new gig). How to understand everything without a brochure in Boris Utkin's new film? For those who are older than 30, what they've seen on the screen would look like another nightclub report, sort of an extended video for Instagram. This is not the first time Utkin distorts the typical nightclub scenario (See “Media critical club report”), but political statements from heroes are indeed heard for the first time. And what else would you expect when schoolkids slam dance to Haski on screen (a popular Russian rapper), whose live performance had been interrupted by the police in Rostov-on-Don? The youth party is homogenous and apolitical but only at first glance. (“I dance and forget about all the worries”). Just like Utkin interweaves this film with references mixing it with Easter muffins, the young heroes, increasing autonomy and creating their own password and coding system. It is necessary when the old system collapses, its representatives won't be able to understand what is happening.

Categories:

Runtime: 
00:16:28

Subtitles:

Information for the Audience: 

Directors: Boris Utkin
Writers:
Producers:
Key cast: Polya Raizman, Snezhok, Havka

Total votes: 107

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